KPS STUDENTS LEARN TO SPOT FAKE NEWS

KPS STUDENTS LEARN TO SPOT FAKE NEWS image

MediaWise, a Google initiative to spot fake news, will be presenting to KPS students next week.    MediaWise is part of the Google News Initiative, funded by Google.org, and aims to teach 1 million teenagers how to spot fake news on the internet by 2020.  The interactive presentation informs students how to fact-check online information.  They will present to Kearney High School freshmen on September 10, 2019, and to 8th-grade students at Horizon and Sunrise Middle Schools on September 11, 2019.

“This is an incredible opportunity for our students to begin viewing the information they see online through a more critical lens,” stated Stefanie Green, Kearney High School Librarian.  “The pairing of the MediaWise speaker and the Stanford History Education Group curriculum will provide our students with the tools needed to effectively evaluate the credibility and reliability of the information they read online."

 The centerpiece of the project is a new curriculum, Civic Online Reasoning, written by grant partner Stanford History Education Group, that will be available to schools across the country in the fall of 2019.  KHS will begin using some of this curriculum this school year. Parents can download the curriculum for free on Stanford’s website (https://sheg.stanford.edu/civic-online-reasoning).   The Civic Online Reasoning curriculum is intended for middle school and high schools students and contains assessments of online reasoning to help judge the credibility of information on the internet which includes Wikipedia, YouTube, Twitter, Webpages, and Social Media.  It helps students evaluate and analyze online evidence.   Sam Wineburg, Stamford Professor on the Stanford History Education Group, states that students are increasingly learning about the world through digital content and the new MediaWise curriculum will help students ‘make sound judgments as citizens’. 

MediaWise was featured on NBC Nightly News, USA Today, Digiday, The Hill, Time Magazine, Wall Street Journal, American Educator, and Usable Knowledge.